Until We Say, Blessed is He Who Comes in the Name of the Lord

2nd Kings 5
1 ¶  Now Naaman, captain of the army of the king of Aram, was a great man with his master, and highly respected, because by him the LORD had given victory to Aram. The man was also a valiant warrior, but he was a leper.

2  Now the Arameans had gone out in bands and had taken captive a little girl from the land of Israel; and she waited on Naaman’s wife.

3  She said to her mistress, “I wish that my master were with the prophet who is in Samaria! Then he would cure him of his leprosy.”

4  Naaman went in and told his master, saying, “Thus and thus spoke the girl who is from the land of Israel.”

5  Then the king of Aram said, “Go now, and I will send a letter to the king of Israel.” He departed and took with him ten talents of silver and six thousand shekels of gold and ten changes of clothes.

6  He brought the letter to the king of Israel, saying, “And now as this letter comes to you, behold, I have sent Naaman my servant to you, that you may cure him of his leprosy.”

7  When the king of Israel read the letter, he tore his clothes and said, “Am I God, to kill and to make alive, that this man is sending word to me to cure a man of his leprosy? But consider now, and see how he is seeking a quarrel against me.”

8  It happened when Elisha the man of God heard that the king of Israel had torn his clothes, that he sent word to the king, saying, “Why have you torn your clothes? Now let him come to me, and he shall know that there is a prophet in Israel.”

9 ¶  So Naaman came with his horses and his chariots and stood at the doorway of the house of Elisha.

10  Elisha sent a messenger to him, saying, “Go and wash in the Jordan seven times, and your flesh will be restored to you and you will be clean.”

11  But Naaman was furious and went away and said, “Behold, I thought, ‘He will surely come out to me and stand and call on the name of the LORD his God, and wave his hand over the place and cure the leper.’

12  “Are not Abanah and Pharpar, the rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel? Could I not wash in them and be clean?” So he turned and went away in a rage.

13  Then his servants came near and spoke to him and said, “My father, had the prophet told you to do some great thing, would you not have done it? How much more then, when he says to you, ‘Wash, and be clean’?”

14  So he went down and dipped himself seven times in the Jordan, according to the word of the man of God; and his flesh was restored like the flesh of a little child and he was clean.

15 ¶  When he returned to the man of God with all his company, and came and stood before him, he said, “Behold now, I know that there is no God in all the earth, but in Israel; so please take a present from your servant now.”

We have within the above passages the revelation of our entrance into Zion. Zion is the realm of sonship, and the realm where all of God’s provision for us is fulfilled.

Verse one tells us that Naaman was a great man and highly respected. He had been blessed by the Lord Himself. But he was a leper. There is much symbolism in this. If we truly have Christ in our hearts, then we too have been blessed of the Lord. Yet, we too have carried leprosy. Our “leprosy” is the fallen, Adamic nature. Quoting Scriptures does not make the various aspects of Adam go away. Sometimes it cloaks Adam in a facade of religiosity, producing a pseudo-spirituality. If this statement is offensive, although it’s not meant to be, it serves as proof that Adam still lingers beneath the surface. It is an experiential work that must be done in us to see Christ’s nature replace Adam’s.

Let’s skip down to verse nine. Naaman came with his horses and chariots and stood at the doorway of the house of Elisha. This is very revealing. Naaman came with all his pride, symbolized by the many horses and chariots. He was an important man, and he made sure everyone knew it. He stood at the doorway of Elisha’s house. Elisha is a type of the Lord in these passages. It is the Lord who cleanses leprosy. Standing in the doorway is significant. It is akin to standing before the gates of Zion. Inside the gates is the Lord Himself. Notice that Elisha himself does not even come out. He sends a messenger to Naaman instead, and tells him how to be cleansed.  Let’s read verse 11 again.

“But Naaman was furious and went away and said, “Behold, I thought, ‘He will surely come out to me and stand and call on the name of the LORD his God, and wave his hand over the place and cure the leper.'”

 Naaman was furious. He wanted Elisha himself to come out and make a big production over his healing. This is always the way of the religious soul realm. Naaman then railed against being asked to wash in the Jordan River. “Are not Abanah and Pharpar, the rivers of Damascus, better than all the waters of Israel?” he asked. Naaman considered the waters of the Jordan not prestigious enough to wash in. Finally, Naaman turned away in a rage. Naaman’s pride certainly took a beating. His rage was indicative of religious pride.

The most important truth in this story is Elisha sending a messenger instead of going to Naaman himself. Elisha’s messenger was a gate into Zion. In these days of the kingdom of God that is opening before us, the Lord will not personally escort us in through the individual relationship with Him that we have known.

Luke 13
34  “O Jerusalem, Jerusalem, the city that kills the prophets and stones those sent to her! How often I wanted to gather your children together, just as a hen gathers her brood under her wings, and you would not have it!
35  “Behold, your house is left to you desolate; and I say to you, you will not see Me until the time comes when you say, ‘BLESSED IS HE WHO COMES IN THE NAME OF THE LORD!’”

 Mystically, Jesus’ lament in verses 34-35 opens a very important truth. Judgment on one level opens the door to a higher level of knowing the Lord. “Blessed is he who comes in the name of the Lord.” In the higher realm of Zion, there are many “messengers” such as the one Elisha sent to speak the word to Naaman. All the gates of Zion come in the name of the Lord. How we receive he/she who comes in the name of the Lord determines many things. We will not enter Zion through our own private relationship with God. That is the Naaman realm. If this offends us, then we are manifesting the same reaction Naaman had. Naaman’s expectations of glory were dashed by a messenger telling him to wash in the muddy Jordan.

Naaman’s own servant spoke truth to him. “My father, had the prophet told you to do some great thing, would you not have done it? How much more then, when he says to you, ‘Wash, and be clean’?” It takes a great deal of humility to enter Zion through the gates of the city. “I don’t need anyone. I trust only in my own personal relationship with God.” This statement violates the entire chapter of 1st Corinthians 12, which is the chapter on the functioning of the body of Christ. Let’s read the last two verses in our story because they reveal a wonderful truth to us.

14  So he went down and dipped himself seven times in the Jordan, according to the word of the man of God; and his flesh was restored like the flesh of a little child and he was clean.
15 ¶  When he returned to the man of God with all his company, and came and stood before him, he said, “Behold now, I know that there is no God in all the earth, but in Israel; so please take a present from your servant now.”

Naaman listened to his servants and did as Elisha instructed him. He came back and stood before Elisha and said, “Behold now, I know that there is no God in all the earth, but in Israel; so please take a present from your servant now.” Elisha, who represents the Lord, sent his messenger to open the doors of healing to Naaman. After Naaman submitted himself to God’s instruction, he received a revelation of the Lord Himself. Nothing else is mentioned about the messenger who was sent. After receiving the word through the messenger, THEN Naaman sees the Lord “face to face.” This is the divine order of the kingdom of God. It’s the hour of individual, independent relationships with God coming to an end. Those who persist in them will never enter Zion, as depicted in Rev. 21. It’s the day of God being revealed in His people. Only as we receive those who come in the name of the Lord will we receive Him. And as we receive Him through the gates that He alone establishes, we find that glorious, wonderful relationship with God that we have hungered for. The day of individuality is passing and the day of oneness is at hand.

 

 

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